Course1

Drafting Buy/Sell Agreements for Closely Held Companies, Part 2

$65.00

There is rarely a liquid market for the sale or exchange of ownership interests in closely-held companies.  Buy/sell agreements fix that problem by creating a market among the owners of a company, providing a mechanism for owners to liquidate their interests in a reliable manner. The owners may agree to buy and sell interests among themselves on the occurrence of certain events and using certain valuation metrics, or they may agree that the company itself will redeem an owner’s interest. Without these agreements, there is often no alternative for an owner to cash out, short of liquidating the company. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the different types of buy/sell agreements, drafting the essential provisions of each, and common negotiating and drafting tips.   Day 1: Types of buy/sell agreements – cross-purchase among owners, entity redemption, and hybrid approaches Most highly negotiated provisions of buy/sell agreements Triggering events – voluntary sale, retirement, death, bankruptcy of shareholder or member Valuation of interests – appraisals, formula clauses,comps, and dispute resolution Rights of first offer v. rights of first refusal, and sales to third parties   Day 2: Funding buy/sell arrangements  – payouts/earnouts over time, commercial borrowing, key-man insurance, other funding sources Special issues involving S Corps and unincorporated entities Drag-along and tag-along rights in buy/sell agreements Major tax issues in buy/sell agreements for buyer, seller and the entity   Speaker: Daniel G. Straga is counsel in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  He also have extensive experience in private equity and cross-border transactions.Mr. Straga earned his and his B.A. from the University of Delaware and his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School.  

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/23/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Professionalism for the Ethical Lawyer

$65.00

Ethics rules, the principles of professionalism, and sanctionable conduct are interrelated.  Lawyers have a duty to zealously represent their clients, but they do not have a duty to engage in offensive conduct that may be desired by clients. Lawyers have duties of confidentiality and honesty, but those duties do not always require pressing every advantage, such as when the lawyer knows that opposing counsel has made a material drafting error in a transactional document. In these and many other scenarios, ethics rules, professionalism, and potentially sanctionable conduct subtly interact.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to professionalism for the ethical lawyer.  Interrelationship of ethics rules, professionalism, and sanctions Zealous representation v. needlessly embarrassing an adversary or third-party Reacting to an adversary’s drafting errors in transactional documents Ethics, professionalism and inadvertent transmission of communications Duty to supervise and train subordinate lawyers and staff, including to ensure courtesy to clients, opposing counsel, and courts Offering candid advice to clients and withdrawal when they demand offensive conduct Avoiding discrimination and bigotry   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the Tysons Corners, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, where he advises firm clients on professional responsibility issues and properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.He has served on the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility,and is a Member of the American Law Institute and a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation.He has written extensively on attorney-client privilege, ethics and other topics, and has spoken at over 1,800 CLE programs throughout the U.S. and in several foreign countries.Through links on his website biography, he has made available to the public  his summaries of over 1,600 Virginia and ABA legal ethics opinions, organized by topic; a 300 page summary of his two-volume 1,500 page book on the attorney-client privilege and work product doctrine; over 900 weekly email alerts about privilege and work product cases; and materials for 40 ethics programs on numerous topics, totaling over 9,000 pages of analysis.Mr. Spahn graduated magna cum laude from Yale University and received his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/24/2021
    Presented
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The Ethics of Representing Two Parties in a Transaction

$65.00

Representing two or more clients in a business or commercial transaction is full of potential ethical traps.  It’s essential that clients understand the potential for conflicts of interest, how confidential information is shared among the joint clients, how negotiating strategies may need to be altered because of the joint representation, and the real risk to the transaction itself if the clients eventually develop unresolvable disputes among themselves. Counseling clients about information flows and obtaining a written waiver of conflicts from all clients are essential first steps but not the end of the process. This program will provide you with a real world guide to representing two or more clients in a business or commercial transaction.   Information flows and potential conflicts of interest Counseling clients about sharing of confidential information – and its implications Drafting conflict of interest waivers Attorney-client privilege issues involved in joint representations Negotiation ethics when representing multiple clients What to do when jointly represented clients disagree   Speaker: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.  Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/25/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Opportunity Zones: The New Wave of Real Estate Finance

$65.00

In recent tax legislation, Congress created “Qualified Opportunity Zones” which provide substantial tax savings or even the elimination of any capital gains taxes on certain real estate.  The U.S. Treasury Department recently released final regulations implanting the law, finally allowing fund sponsors and investors the certainty they need to form funds and place investments. This program will review the major tax benefits of Opportunity Zones, the restrictions and requirements imposed by the regulations on these funds, and practical steps in drafting OZ documents.  Tax benefits to real estate investors in Qualified Opportunity Zones Review of recently released final QOZ final regulations Choice of entity for QOZ investments – what entities are better suited to the opportunity Relationship of QOZ benefits to Section 1231 property Key restrictions imposed by the new law and integrating them into transaction documents Counseling clients about the tradeoffs involved n QOZ transactions   Speaker: Ira B. Stechel is a partner in the New York City office of Akerman, LLP and has more than four decades experience representing clients in complex tax planning, controversy, and employee benefit matters.  His experience includes structuring tax efficient transactions and representing taxpayers involved in tax disputes and controversies before various taxing authorities at the federal, state, and local levels. He advises on corporate and real estate transaction work.  He is a member of the ABA Section of Taxation Committee on Real Estate, among other committees, and a member of the advisory board of Bloomberg BNA Tax Management, Inc.  Mr. Stechel earned his B.A. from the City College of New York, his J.D. from Cornell Law School, and his LL.M. from New York University. 

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/28/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Drafting Small Commecial Real Estate Leases

$65.00

In small space leases, tenants are much more sensitive to the cost or reviewing and negotiating lengthy leases. The panoply of tenant use restrictions in lengthier leases tend to suffocate the ability of smaller tenants to operate their businesses. Landlord rights and remedies in “short “form” leases tend to leave tenants with little flexibility and few remedies for landlord breaches.  At the same time, landlords fear the instability and costs associated with small tenants. This makes focusing on the economic essentials important to landlords and the operating essentials important to tenants in small leases very important. This program will provide you a real world guide to reviewing a small commercial lease, including economics, use restrictions, subleasing, and remedies. Red flags in “short form” leases for small tenants Ensuring “use” restrictions allow tenant to operate its business Common area maintenance, taxes, insurance, fees and penalties Scope of landlord services to tenant – and landlord remedies Exit issues – “go dark” provisions, subletting, tail liability    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/29/2021
    Presented
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Ethics in Negotiations – Boasts, Shading, and Impropriety

$65.00

Lawyers must always be truthful in their representations. Yet they must be zealous in representing clients. The tension between these two principles is perhaps never as great as when the lawyer is negotiating for a client. The lawyer may make statements about the law or fact – or simply refrain from making statements because the lawyer knows certain facts or legal precedent are adverse to a client’s interest.   Lawyers may also boast, signaling that a client’s position is stronger than is, in fact, the case. Navigating these gray lines is the difference between ethical representation and impropriety. This program will provide you with a guide to ethical issues in negotiations.    Truthful representations v. zealous representations? Affirmative statements of fact, value or intent in settlements Silence about adverse law in negotiations Silence about facts unknown to an opponent or counter-party Silence about errors in settlement agreements or transactional documents Non-litigation work in another state – “temporary” practice   Speakers: Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump’s offices worldwide.  Previously, she practiced law in Washington DC and New York, focusing on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures.  She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee.  She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues.   She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/30/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 1

$65.00

There is no larger market than sales of goods to consumers.  Though the opportunities for your clients are vast, selling to consumers is unlike selling to other businesses. Sales to consumers are governed by overlapping layers of regulations covering how those sales are financed, what warranties are implied by law versus expressly made by the seller, and – when need arises – debt collection of defaulted accounts. Failure to understand and comply with these layers of complexity can lead to consumer complaints and regulatory action, litigation and substantial liability. This program will provide you a framework for understanding the law of consumer sales, including financing those sales, express and implied warranties imposed by law, and debt collection from consumers.  Day 1: Essential law governing sales to consumers – sales law, finance, warranties Sales law – how consumer sales differ from commercial sales Consumer finance – securing the sales with collateral and anticipating defaults Role of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code and Reg Z Role of the new federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau   Day 2: Understanding the role of implied and express warranties in consumer sales under federal law Limiting a seller’s exposure to warranties and otherwise managing risk Overview Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Consumer Credit Protection Act Permissible debt collection practices in consumer sales and potential liability Communications with debtors and third parties and required disclosures Best practices to avoid liability for businesses, lawyers, and law firms   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/1/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 2

$65.00

  There is no larger market than sales of goods to consumers.  Though the opportunities for your clients are vast, selling to consumers is unlike selling to other businesses. Sales to consumers are governed by overlapping layers of regulations covering how those sales are financed, what warranties are implied by law versus expressly made by the seller, and – when need arises – debt collection of defaulted accounts. Failure to understand and comply with these layers of complexity can lead to consumer complaints and regulatory action, litigation and substantial liability. This program will provide you a framework for understanding the law of consumer sales, including financing those sales, express and implied warranties imposed by law, and debt collection from consumers.  Day 1: Essential law governing sales to consumers – sales law, finance, warranties Sales law – how consumer sales differ from commercial sales Consumer finance – securing the sales with collateral and anticipating defaults Role of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code and Reg Z Role of the new federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau   Day 2: Understanding the role of implied and express warranties in consumer sales under federal law Limiting a seller’s exposure to warranties and otherwise managing risk Overview Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Consumer Credit Protection Act Permissible debt collection practices in consumer sales and potential liability Communications with debtors and third parties and required disclosures Best practices to avoid liability for businesses, lawyers, and law firms   Speakers:  Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/2/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Risky Tenants: Drafting Issues for Landlords

$65.00

  Landlords (and their lenders) want nothing more than certainty in the stream of rental payments from tenants. When risks are involved – because of the profile of the tenant or the nature of its operations – landlords seek to offset the risk through higher rents and protective provisions in leases. Those provisions may include restrictions on usage, insurance requirements, more thoroughgoing inspections or other restrictions.  This program will provide you with a guide to drafting and negotiating leases when a landlord has a risky tenant, with an emphasis on offsetting or compensation for that additional risk.    Drafting protections for landlords when tenants pose legal or operational risks – including cannabis businesses Identifying points of potential liability – financial and otherwise – for landlords Drafting scope of tenant use to permit activity but limit landlord risk Economic issues – rent, guarantees, insurance, supplemental payments, escrow Termination provisions – when can the landlord pull the plug?   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/5/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Lawyer Ethics When Working with Paralegals

$65.00

Paralegals are often essential for lawyers to successfully practice law.  Paralegals conduct basic legal research, help review and prepare documents, and sometimes screen clients.  Still, they are not lawyers and not directly subject to the ethics rules applicable to lawyers. But the lawyers who supervise their work are responsible for their actions and liable for any improper conduct.  Lawyers are responsible for ensuring that their paralegals’ work conforms to ethics rules. If a paralegal’s actions breach client confidentiality, compromise the attorney-client privilege, or are otherwise improper, the supervising lawyer is ethically responsible for that misconduct.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to how ethics rules make supervising lawyers responsible for the actions of their paralegals.   Conflicts of interest and the attribution of paralegal knowledge about client matters Determining when paralegal research and document preparation becomes the unauthorized practice of law How paralegals must be instructed about client confidentiality – and lawyer consequences on breach Attorney-client privilege implications when clients communicate with paralegals – and risk of inadvertent disclosure Issues when paralegals participate in discovery Fee sharing with paralegals   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/6/2021
    Presented
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Employee Leave Law

$65.00

Employers are required to provide leave to employees and often reinstate them to the same job category when they return.  The FMLA, ADA and other federal statues establish a variety of eligibility standards and circumstances in which employers must offer leave or incur liability for failure to do so. The complexity of these statutes exposes clients to substantial risk and liability if leave policy is not properly drafted and administered. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the sources of federal employee leave law, covered employees and qualifying circumstances, how leave can and should be incorporated into employer policies and handbooks to avoid liability.   Recent developments impacting employee leave Who is covered by leave law and what circumstances are entitled to leave? Duration of leave and what compensation/benefits must employers provide Job category reinstatement after leave Incorporating leave into employer policies and employee handbooks Medical certificate, proof of eligibility, administration of leave policy   Speaker: Kenneth M. Willner is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Paul Hastings, LLP, and chair of the office's employment law practice.  He represents employers in all aspects of employment law and litigation including wrongful discharge, discrimination, sexual harassment, disability discrimination, class actions, and individual cases in federal and state courts and before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs.  Mr. Willner received his B.A., with distinction, from the University of Virginia, and his J.D. from the University of Virginia Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/7/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Drafting Liquidated Damages Clauses

$65.00

Liquidated damages clauses are a risk allocation tool used across business, commercial, real estate and sometimes employment agreements.  On the occurrence of certain carefully defined triggering events, the breaching party is liable for the liquidated damages amount.  Triggering events run the gamut from failure to deliver marketable products on a timely basis to early termination of an employment contract. Though these clauses are intended reduce the risk of post-closing litigation over damages, the scope of damages is not always knowable at closing and poorly drafted clauses may cause more litigation. This program will provide you a real world guide to the essential elements of enforceable liquidated damages clauses.   Law governing liquidated damages clauses Elements of clauses – damages difficult to quantify and liquidated amount reasonably related to actual damages Guidance on optionality, specificity, self-justification, and triggers Circumstances in which clauses are most effectively used – and those where they are ineffective Practical tips of enhancing enforceability and collecting damages   Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where has litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and office liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivate actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/8/2021
    Presented
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Default and Eviction of Commercial Real Estate Tenants

$65.00

When a commercial real estate tenant defaults on a lease, there is substantial risk not only for the tenant but also for the landlord.  Though the lease may specify extensive landlord remedies, most courts will strictly construe the lease against the landlord, requiring strict adherence to notice of default and other process-related provisions in the lease. Failure to comply with these provisions and the requirements of law exposes the landlord to substantial liability, including lease termination and loss of rent, even though the tenant is in default. There are additional risks if the landlord accepts partial rent payments from the tenant or takes possession of the leasehold or tenant chattels. This program will provide you with a practical guide to tenant default under commercial leases and provide tips for drafting leases to protect landlords.   Drafting in anticipation of tenant default Essential steps in providing notice of default and eviction Common landlord mistakes – waiver of tenant default, tenant lockouts, disposal of tenant/third party property Liability issues for landlord – lease termination, loss of rent, damages Tenant remedies for improper landlord actions   Speaker: John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.  He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.  He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.  He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.  He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.  He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/9/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Due Diligence in Business Transactions

$65.00

Due diligence, often guided by lawyers, is essential to the success of major business transactions and poorly planned or conducted diligence can contribute to a buyer not getting the benefit of its bargain.  Diligence helps confirm essential assumptions about the value of a transaction and aids the discovery of unknown liabilities. There’s also a subtle relationship between the content of diligence and the time allowed to conduct it.  In more robust market environments, sellers have the upper hand and can limit diligence, making the process about time allocation and risk management. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning the diligence process, understanding the most important areas of inquiry depending on the type of transaction, and review checklists.   What to diligence, utilizing experts, and managing the process and time Impact of market environment on the length and scope of diligence Checklists – what information do you need to get, from whom, and on what timeline? Hard assets v. soft assets – how to diligence the validity and title to each Contracts with suppliers and customers – ensuring stability and visibility of revenue Financial records and statements – what should attorneys look for?   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/12/2021
    Presented
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Trust & Estate Planning for Real Estate, Part 1

$65.00

Trust and estate planning for real estate and real estate entrepreneurs is full of special challenges.  Real estate is illiquid, its value can swing wildly, and it can be difficult to value.  Commercial real estate may be owned in an LLC and subject to complex contractual relationships that make transferring it difficult.  There are also the challenges of transferring a unique family property – a personal residence, or family vacation property, a farm or ranch. This program will provide you a detailed guide to trust and estate planning for real property assets and for real estate entrepreneurs.   Day 1: Planning opportunities and challenges for real estate and real estate entrepreneurs Planning for lifetime giving of fractional interests in real estate Asset protection techniques for real estate assets Issues related to restructured real estate assets Planning for family properties – QPRTs, SERTs, and LLC techniques   Day 2: Unique challenges of planning for liquidity with illiquid assets Valuation discount issues and planning in a rising but volatile market Value freezing techniques using LLCs Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT), sales to defective grantor trusts, and sales of self-cancelling installment notes Charitable giving techniques for real estate   Speakers: Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. Michael Sneeringer an attorney in the Naples, Florida office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP, where his practice focuses on trust and estate planning, probate administration, asset protection planning, and tax law. He has served as vice chair of the asset protection planning committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust and Estate Section and is an official reporter of the Heckerling Institute.  Mr. Sneeringer received his B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College, his J.D., cum laude, St. Thomas University School of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/13/2021
    Presented
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Trust & Estate Planning for Real Estate, Part 2

$65.00

Trust and estate planning for real estate and real estate entrepreneurs is full of special challenges.  Real estate is illiquid, its value can swing wildly, and it can be difficult to value.  Commercial real estate may be owned in an LLC and subject to complex contractual relationships that make transferring it difficult.  There are also the challenges of transferring a unique family property – a personal residence, or family vacation property, a farm or ranch. This program will provide you a detailed guide to trust and estate planning for real property assets and for real estate entrepreneurs.   Day 1: Planning opportunities and challenges for real estate and real estate entrepreneurs Planning for lifetime giving of fractional interests in real estate Asset protection techniques for real estate assets Issues related to restructured real estate assets Planning for family properties – QPRTs, SERTs, and LLC techniques   Day 2: Unique challenges of planning for liquidity with illiquid assets Valuation discount issues and planning in a rising but volatile market Value freezing techniques using LLCs Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT), sales to defective grantor trusts, and sales of self-cancelling installment notes Charitable giving techniques for real estate   Speakers: Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. Michael Sneeringer an attorney in the Naples, Florida office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP, where his practice focuses on trust and estate planning, probate administration, asset protection planning, and tax law. He has served as vice chair of the asset protection planning committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust and Estate Section and is an official reporter of the Heckerling Institute.  Mr. Sneeringer received his B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College, his J.D., cum laude, St. Thomas University School of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/14/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Drafting Client Engagement Letters in Trust and Estate Planning

$65.00

Client engagement letters are the foundation of a successful representation in trust and estate planning, administration or fiduciary litigation.  It’s where expectations are set – about fees, timelines, and who you are representing. Difficult issues involving conflicts of interests and decision-making can also be framed and addressed. These letters clarify goals and substantially reduce the risk of later dispute.  This program will provide you a practical guide to using client engagement letters to provide the foundation of a successful relationship in trust and estate planning, administration and litigation. Most important elements of successful client engagement letter Spousal representations – joint representation or separate, and practical difficulties of each Representing multiple generations of a family – who is in charge?   Lawyer as fiduciary – what must you do if you’re the trustee How to handle extant or developing client incapacity Ongoing communication and billing issues Providing for withdrawal from an engagement – when and how   Speaker: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/15/2021
    Presented
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Lawyer Ethics & Credit Cards

$65.00

Use of credit cards by law firms and lawyers is commonplace. Law firms may accept credit cards as means of payment for fees and expenses. This concession to the larger reality of the economy, however, raises many ethical issues. Can lawyers pass on credit card processing fees (which can be substantial) to clients?  What happens if a client’s credit card company does a chargeback of fees?  How does a lawyer maintain confidentiality when he or she has a dispute with a credit card company, or the client has a dispute with the credit card company?  These and many issues arise when lawyers accept credit cards from clients. This program will provide you with a guide to ethical issues when credit cards are accepted and used in law practice.    Passing on credit card processing fees to clients Truth-in-Lending issues and tax penalties Ethical issues when credit card companies chargeback funds paid to a lawyer or from a trust account Confidentiality when a client has a dispute with his or her credit card company Use of credit cards to fund a retainer and related trust fund accounting issues Creditor claims against trust fund accounts Leftover client funds and proper trust fund accounting   Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/16/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Capital Calls – Agreements to Contribute More Capital Over Time

$65.00

Please note program start time is 12:00pm CentralPlanning for elderly clients has special challenges. There are competing demands of providing for clients in their latter years, growing health issues, and a desire to leave something for their children or for their grandchildren’s education. There is also the increasing incidence of late-in-life divorces. How to satisfy these demands in a tax-efficient and administratively easy way requires the use of many tools. This program will provide you with a practical guide to estate and trust planning for elderly clients, including spotting and identifying capacity issues, planning for long-term medical care, issues surrounding personal residences, planning for grandchildren’s education, and drafting plans that will withstand litigation.Day 1 – February 7, 2012:Counseling the elderly –identifying and dealing with capacity issuesLate-in-life divorces for the elderly and related estate issuesProperty management, conservators and guardiansPlanning for personal residencesCreating estate plans that can withstand litigation by heirsDay 2 – February 8, 2012:Health care issues, including durable powers of attorney and advance medical directivesPlanning for chronic illnessesUse of revocable trustsGifting strategies, including gifts to fund grandchildren educationAsset protection trustsSpeakers:Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses. She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities. Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001. She is a former trustee of the Catholic Charities Corporation and former chair of the entity’s Planned Giving Committee. Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.Daniel J. Hoffheimer is a partner in the Cincinnati office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where his law practice concentrates on advising nonprofit organizations and charitable foundations, and estate planning, trust and probate law. He is a Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel and formerly served as a Lecturer-in-Law at the University of Cincinnati College of Law. Mr. Hoffheimer formerly served as the president of Cincinnati Bar Association and currently serves on the Section Council of the Estate Planning, Trust and Probate Law Section of the Ohio State Bar Association. He received his B.S. from Harvard University and his J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/19/2021
    Presented
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Ethics and New Clients: Inadvertent Clients, Intake, and more

$65.00

Getting a client relationship right from the outset – defining scope, setting reasonable expectations – greatly helps set up the relationship for success and helps avoid disputes with clients.  There are issues of identifying and clearing conflicts of interest, or getting them waived in writing.  There are issues of explaining billing policies to clients, ensuring they understand, and putting it in writing. There are issues of communication – explaining how and when you will communicate with clients about their case, and about decision-making.This program will provide you a practical guide to drafting engagement letters and best practices in new client intake.    Engagement letters – best practices in setting scope and expectations Explaining bill rates and practices – tips on avoiding disputes Conflict of interest clearance – current clients, past clients Drafting and obtaining conflict of interest waivers Attorney-client privilege considerations   Speakers: Matthew Corbin is Senior Vice President and Executive Director in the Professional Services Group of AON Risk Services, where he consults with the company’s law firm clients on professional responsibility and liability issues.  Before joining AON, he was a partner with Lathrop & Gage, LLP, where he was a trial and appellate lawyer handling professional liability, commercial, business tort, employment, construction, insurance, and regulatory matters. Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Mary Briscoe of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.  Mr. Corbin earned his B.A. from the University of Kansas and his J.D. from the University of Kansas School of Law. Mark A. Webster is Vice President and Director in the Professional Services Group of AON Risk Services.  He consults with the company’s law firm clients on professional responsibility and liability issues.  Before joining AON, he was a partner with Lathrop & Gage, LLP, where he had an extensive real estate transactions practice.  Mr. Webster received his B.A. from the University of Kansas and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/20/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Trust and Estate Planning for Second Marriages

$65.00

Second marriages pose a wide range of planning challenges.  Planning for the equitable distribution of property in “blended” families – children or grandchildren from a prior marriage, a second spouse, and perhaps children from the second marriage – is fraught with legal and emotional landmines well beyond customary tax planning.  Failure to carefully consider objectives and consequences and to communicate and execute plans can easily leave a client’s estate exposed to open and raw disputes among competing heirs and eventually to destructive fiduciary litigation. This program will provide you with a guide to the practical, substantive and tax aspects of planning for clients with second marriages and blended families.   Emotional context of planning for remarried clients and blended families Use of pre-martial agreements to spot contentious issues, align interests, and decrease post-mortem litigation Income tax planning issues for the second marriage, including exemptions and credits Use of trusts and gifting to prevent unjust enrichment of one branch of a blended family Traps and opportunities with retirement benefits Post-mortem planning techniques when the first spouse dies – and issues on the “second death”   Speakers:  Michael Sneeringer an attorney in the Naples, Florida office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP, where his practice focuses on trust and estate planning, probate administration, asset protection planning, and tax law. He has served as vice chair of the asset protection planning committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust and Estate Section and is an official reporter of the Heckerling Institute.  Mr. Sneeringer received his B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College, his J.D., cum laude, St. Thomas University School of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami School of Law. Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/21/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Choice of Entity for Nonprofits & Obtaining Tax Exempt Status, Part 1

$65.00

  Counseling a client about choice of entity for a nonprofit or charitable enterprise is a multilayered process.  First, clients need to understand that not all nonprofits are charities. Even if the enterprise is nonprofit and charitable in nature that does not necessarily mean the enterprise is eligible for tax-exempt status. Once these distinctions are made, attorneys need to counsel clients about the subtle advantages and disadvantages of four major types of entities, all formed under state law. Second, there is the distinct issue of how that entity is classified for federal tax purposes. Each classification comes with its own subtle tradeoffs.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to non-profit choice of entity and obtaining tax-exempt status.  Day 1: Framework of major choice of entity considerations for nonprofit and charitable organizations – corporations, LLCs and trusts Private foundations v. public charities – tradeoffs, costs, compliance Restrictions on the activities and investments of each type of entity, including joint ventures with profit-making organizations   Day 2: Considerations involving joint ventures between for-profit and non-profit entities Practical Process of obtaining tax-exempt status – eligibility, timelines, and costs Counseling clients about ongoing compliance reporting   Speaker: Michael Lehmann is a partner in the New York office of Dechert, LLP, where he specializes in tax issues related to non-profits and in the tax treatment of cross-border transactions.  He advises hospitals and other health care providers, research organizations, low-income housing developers, trade associations, private foundations and arts organizations.He advises clients on obtaining and maintaining tax-exempt status, executive compensation, reorganizations and joint ventures, acquisitions, and unrelated business income planning.Mr. Lehmann received his A.B., magna cum laude, from Brown University, his J.D. from Columbia Law School, and his LL.M. from New York University School of Law.  

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/22/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Choice of Entity for Nonprofits & Obtaining Tax Exempt Status, Part 2

$65.00

Counseling a client about choice of entity for a nonprofit or charitable enterprise is a multilayered process.  First, clients need to understand that not all nonprofits are charities. Even if the enterprise is nonprofit and charitable in nature that does not necessarily mean the enterprise is eligible for tax-exempt status. Once these distinctions are made, attorneys need to counsel clients about the subtle advantages and disadvantages of four major types of entities, all formed under state law. Second, there is the distinct issue of how that entity is classified for federal tax purposes. Each classification comes with its own subtle tradeoffs.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to non-profit choice of entity and obtaining tax-exempt status.   Day 1: Framework of major choice of entity considerations for nonprofit and charitable organizations – corporations, LLCs and trusts Private foundations v. public charities – tradeoffs, costs, compliance Restrictions on the activities and investments of each type of entity, including joint ventures with profit-making organizations   Day 2: Considerations involving joint ventures between for-profit and non-profit entities Practical Process of obtaining tax-exempt status – eligibility, timelines, and costs Counseling clients about ongoing compliance reporting   Speaker: Michael Lehmann is a partner in the New York office of Dechert, LLP, where he specializes in tax issues related to non-profits and in the tax treatment of cross-border transactions.  He advises hospitals and other health care providers, research organizations, low-income housing developers, trade associations, private foundations and arts organizations.He advises clients on obtaining and maintaining tax-exempt status, executive compensation, reorganizations and joint ventures, acquisitions, and unrelated business income planning.Mr. Lehmann received his A.B., magna cum laude, from Brown University, his J.D. from Columbia Law School, and his LL.M. from New York University School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/23/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Domestic Asset Protection Strategies for Trust and Estate Planners

$65.00

Though asset protection planning often seems to be the province of off-shore trusts available to only a limited range of clients, in fact asset protection planning utilizes a wide range of domestic planning vehicles, tools, and techniques that are of great value to many clients.  Exemption planning allows clients to preserve real estate and other forms of property against claims of creditors and tort claimants. Retirement plans, annuity and insurance contracts, properly structured and held, also provide creative solutions to protect assets.Each of these vehicles and techniques comes with risks that must be carefully explored, explained and hedged.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to utilizing domestic asset protection techniques to achieve client goals in trust and estate planning.   Asset protection with self-settled trusts, single member LLCs, and other entities Use of retirement fund accounts and plans to shield assets Strategies using annuity and insurance products to preserve assets Planning to maximize “exempt” assets under federal & state bankruptcy and creditor laws Risks and penalties if certain transfers are deemed fraudulent conveyances   Speaker: Jonathan E. Gopman is the managing partner of the Naples, Florida office of Akerman. LLP, where his practice focuses on sophisticated wealth accumulation and preservation planning strategies for entrepreneurs.  He is co-author of the revised version of the BNA Tax Management Portfolio “Estate Tax Payments and Liabilities.”  He is also a commentator on asset protection planning matters for Leimberg Information Services, Inc., a member of the legal advisory board of Commonwealth Trust Company in Wilmington, Delaware, and a member of the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners. Mr. Gopman received his B.A. from the University of South Florida, his J.D. from Florida State University College of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/26/2021
    Presented
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Unwinding a Commercial Real Estate Transaction Gone Bad, Part 1

$65.00

  When a real estate project goes bad for whatever reason – sales are slow or at prices below projections, leasing is slow, or there are extensive cost-overruns or regulatory delays – developers, investors, lenders, and others are left scrambling to restructure the project and salvage any value or at least limit losses.This often involves restructuring or possibly refinancing a loan.  It may also involve additional equity.  Another option is selling the project, if possible.  These processes can be complicated by the nature of the investors and lenders involved.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to restructuring troubled real estate projects.    Day 1: Practical strategies for unwinding real estate deals outside of bankruptcy or litigation Negotiating, structuring and drafting the restructuring of failed real estate projects Underlying economics and tradeoffs of real estate restructuring Types of sellers and their impact on restructuring – individual owner, institutional, joint venture, private equity Complications and limitations involving syndicated loans, CMBS loans, and REMICs Navigating seller issues – personal guaranties, ongoing management fees, upside participation, reputation   Day 2: Restructuring alternatives, including straight purchases, “Loan to Own,” rescue capital/preferred stock/securities Drafting forbearance and loan modification agreements Receivership of distressed properties and planning to emerge from receivership “Loan to own” strategies and limitations Tax issues, including cancellation of indebtedness and restructuring recourse indebtedness Potential loss of valuable tax attributes and tax planning opportunities   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  He speaks extensively on real estate topics nationally.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/27/2021
    Presented
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Unwinding a Commercial Real Estate Transaction Gone Bad, Part 2

$65.00

When a real estate project goes bad for whatever reason – sales are slow or at prices below projections, leasing is slow, or there are extensive cost-overruns or regulatory delays – developers, investors, lenders, and others are left scrambling to restructure the project and salvage any value or at least limit losses.This often involves restructuring or possibly refinancing a loan.  It may also involve additional equity.  Another option is selling the project, if possible.  These processes can be complicated by the nature of the investors and lenders involved.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to restructuring troubled real estate projects.    Day 1: Practical strategies for unwinding real estate deals outside of bankruptcy or litigation Negotiating, structuring and drafting the restructuring of failed real estate projects Underlying economics and tradeoffs of real estate restructuring Types of sellers and their impact on restructuring – individual owner, institutional, joint venture, private equity Complications and limitations involving syndicated loans, CMBS loans, and REMICs Navigating seller issues – personal guaranties, ongoing management fees, upside participation, reputation   Day 2: Restructuring alternatives, including straight purchases, “Loan to Own,” rescue capital/preferred stock/securities Drafting forbearance and loan modification agreements Receivership of distressed properties and planning to emerge from receivership “Loan to own” strategies and limitations Tax issues, including cancellation of indebtedness and restructuring recourse indebtedness Potential loss of valuable tax attributes and tax planning opportunities   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  He speaks extensively on real estate topics nationally.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/28/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: Ethical Issues for Small Law Firms: Technology, Paralegals, Remote Practice & More

$65.00

Solo and small firm practitioners wear many hats. They practice law but also run the office and manage all of its information technology – file storage, email, and Web sites.  They may supervise paralegals or contract attorneys. They also need to be attentive to developing new clients. Each of these and other roles comes with ethical issues and traps.  Email, file storage, and law firm web sites implicate issues of competence, confidentiality, and potentially the attorney-client privilege.  Supervising paralegals or junior attorneys implicates supervisory ethics and conflicts of interest.  Client development also implicates a range of ethics issues.  It’s a lot to manage for a firm of any size, but particularly for smaller firms.This program will provide you with a practical guide to major ethics issues for solo and small firm practitioners.   Ethical issues for small law firms and solo practitioners Technology – storing client files in “the Cloud,” email traps, and remote networks Pooled Resources – shared office/meeting space, shared support staff, shared technology Client Development – web sites and lawyer biographies, email/newsletters, social media, advertising and more Paralegals – training and billing, confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege Co-Counsel – ethical responsibilities when practicing with other lawyers   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. H. Michael Drumm is the founder and member of Drumm Law, LLC in Denver, Colorado, where he has an extensive franchise, trademark and business transactional practice.  He works with franchisors across industries nationwide helping them draft, file and renew their franchise Disclosure Documents and franchise agreements.  He has a specialty representing craft breweries to help them trademark their brands and protect their intellectual property. He has been repeatedly honored by Franchise Times magazine as a “Legal Eagle” and has been designated by the International Franchise Association as a “Certified Franchise Executive.”  Mr. Drumm received his BSBA from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/29/2021
    Presented
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Good Faith and Fair Dealing in Business Transactions: Litigation Risks

$65.00

When business transactions go bad – either because they fail on their own terms or they never reach the closing table – there are often recriminations, accusations of bad-faith and threats of litigation.  The parties negotiating these transactions are subject to certain standards of conduct which, if violated, give rise to liability. Various theories of liability exist, including breach of the duty of good faith and fair dealing, negligent or fraudulent misrepresentation, and interference with a business expectancy. This program will provide you with real-world guide to the standards of conduct in business transactions and your clients can mitigate risk of liability.   Sources of fiduciary standards in negotiating, drafting and closing business transactions How fiduciary standards are commonly breached in transactions Role of business torts, including negligent and fraudulent misrepresentation, interference with a business expectancy Risks of litigation and practical remedies – damages, rescission, specific performance Special duties in closely held businesses, including misappropriation of company opportunities   Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly Law Partners, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/30/2021
    Presented
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LIVE REPLAY: 2021 Uniform Commercial Code/Commercial Law Update

$65.00

The overlapping articles of the UCC impact most business, commercial and real estate transactions.  From the perfection of security interests to the enforceability of promissory notes and investment contracts to equipment leases and the sale of goods, the UCC plays a role in most significant transactions. This program, led by one of the nation’s leading authorities on the UCC, will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of developments under the many articles of the UCC, including secured transactions, investment notes, sales, and equipment leasing. Recent UCC developments for transactional attorneys Developments impacting commercial, business and real estate transactions UCC Article 9, asset-based transactions and secured transactions Sales of goods contracts Equipment leases, including computer equipment and capital equipment Notes, guarantees and letters of credit   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/2/2021
    Presented
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Incentive Compensation in Businesses, Part 1

$65.00

To Be Determined

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 8/3/2021
    Presented
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